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Linotype Mixer?

Started by Mechanic, July 16, 2009, 09:49:01 PM

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Mechanic

The following web site will take you to a 1915 publication of The Book Of Wonders and a description of how the Linotype works. The Linotype illustrated  is a model I have not seen before. It appears to be a mixer that requires the front of the magazine to move up and down for mixing along the lines of the model 25.

http://www.infomercantile.com/-/How_A_Linotype_Machine_Works%2C_The_Book_of_Wonders




The nameplate reads
MANUFACTURER
MERGENTHALER LINOTYPE CO.
NEW YORK USA
George Finn (Mechanic)
Gold Coast
Queensland
AUSTRALIA


Patrick Leary

The model pictured is a Model 9, which came out in the 1920s, I believe. The magazines were in the shape of parallellograms and possibly contained their own verges/escapements. The mats had to be cut to run in a certain position in the machine, and couldn't be interchanged. The operator could mix from ALL FOUR magazines, because distribution was simultaneous. A version with four auxiliaries was the Model 24. They were rather challenging to maintain.
F.R.  Edgecombe/Printer of Kalamazoo at one time owned two (2) model 9s, and in 1951 I got to set a paragraph on one of them.
In the late '70s he had downsized to a typography shop (for printers who had disposed of their hot metal equipment) and was setting a large ad in Memphis when I visited his rural shop--despite the inroads cold type had made in the industry.
I think the Model 9 had at least five (5) distributor screws.
Patrick Leary, Harold's Printing Co., Brookings, S.D.

Mechanic

Thank you  Patrick, As it turns out there was already a photo of the model 9 in the photo section of Metal Type. I must have looked at the photos half a dozen times in the past, but it didn't register. I agree they must have been a challenge to maintain. I would have loved to have had a go.
 
George Finn (Mechanic)
Gold Coast
Queensland
AUSTRALIA


Dave Hughes

Here it is, the picture of the Model 9.

This little puzzle was a lot easier to resolve than this one:

http://www.metaltype.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,444.0.html

Which still seems to have most people baffled

Model 9

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